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May 8, 2014

 

The Taylor House Museum of Historic Frenchtown receives its 2014 Heritage Education Award at the Tallahassee-Leon County Historic Preservation Awards from the Tallahassee Trust for Historic Preservation. The museum was honored for exemplifying excellence in preserving the history of the Frenchtown community.

Community Partners

  • Goodwood Museum and Gardens

 

  • Leon County Schools

  • Knott House Museum

  • Visit Tallahassee

 

  • Florida A&M University

 

  • Council on Culture and Arts (COCA)

  • Meek-Eaton Black Archives

  • Tallahassee Trust for Historic Preservation

  • James and Dorothy Tookes House 

  • Tallahassee Branch of the NAACP

The Taylor House Museum of Historic Frenchtown

442 West Georgia Street

Tallahassee, Florida 32301

 

A National Register of Historic Places Property

 

Phone: (850) 222-6111

www.tallahasseeurbanleague.org  

E-mail: TaylorHouse@tallahasseeurbanleague.org

Lewis W. Taylor

 

Lucretia M. Taylor

 

News

For Immediate Release:                                               

 

Contact: Curtis Taylor

                                                                                                        (850) 222-6111 Office

                                                                                                            (850) 561-8390 Fax

www.tallahasseeurbanleague.org

 

February 26, 2015

 

Tallahassee Urban League Celebrates Black History Month at

Taylor House Museum of Historic Frenchtown

 

 

Tallahassee, FLA - The Taylor House Museum of Historic Frenchtown, operated by the Tallahassee Urban League, Inc. (TUL) is pleased to announce the unveiling of “Black Business in the Golden Era of Frenchtown.” The program will honor and recognize survivors as well as family members of African-American business owners, whose valiant efforts to preserve the heritage of the heart of the Black community in Tallahassee have heretofore been unrecognized.

 

The event will be held on Friday, February 27, 2015 at 1 P.M. at the Taylor House Museum, 442 W. Georgia St. in Tallahassee.

 

The “Black Business in the Golden Era of Frenchtown” exhibition will coincide with the 50th anniversary commemoration of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, as well as the 150th anniversary of the passage of the 13th amendment to the Constitution which abolished slavery in the United States.

 

Additionally, The Taylor House will re-create the student sit-in movement of the 1960s in conjunction with the world-renowned Black Heritage Museum and its founder, Priscilla Stephens Kruize. As a student at Florida A&M University in 1959, Kruize and her sister, the late Patricia Stephens Due organized the Tallahassee Chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). The sisters led and organized numerous civil rights demonstrations, sit-ins and picket lines during this time. Kruize will be on hand at the exhibit unveiling ceremony.

 

Among others who will be honored with the opening of “Black Business in the Golden Era of Frenchtown” include the late Mamie Strong and Elbert Jones, founders of Strong & Jones Funeral Home; Howard and Geraldine Roberts, owners of the Economy Drug Store; and Eddie Randolph of Randolph’s Alterations.

 

For more information, contact Curtis Taylor at (850) 251-3025, or (850) 222-6111.

 

 

 

The Taylor House has been placed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places

http://www.nps.gov/nr/listings/20150417.htm

Press Release

 

For Immediate Release:                                               Contact: Curtis Taylor

                                                                                                      

 

(850) 222-6111 Office

(850) 561-8390 Fax

 

TurbanLeague@Yahoo.com

www.tallahasseeurbanleague.org

 

April 30, 2015

 

Taylor House Museum of Historic Frenchtown Provides 2nd Annual Blended Lives Program for Leon County School Students 

 

Tallahassee, FLA - The Taylor House Museum of Historic Frenchtown, operated by the Tallahassee Urban League, Inc. (TUL) is pleased to announce the culmination of the 2nd annual Blended Lives Program, in conjunction with the Leon County School District and Goodwood Museum and Gardens. The program will honor and recognize the post-civil war, as museum staff will dazzle hundreds of elementary and middle school students with live demonstrations of how emancipated slaves lived in the historic Frenchtown community lived during the 1800s. 

The event will be held on Friday, May 1, 2015 at 11 A.M. at the Taylor House Museum, 442 W. Georgia St. in Tallahassee.

 

The Taylor House’s 2nd annual “Blended Lives” program will coincide with both the 150th anniversary of the reading of the Emancipation Proclamation, as well as the passage of the 13th amendment to the U.S. Constitution which abolished slavery in the United States.

 

With Emancipation bringing an end to the American Civil War, many newly freed slaves moved from Leon County plantations mostly located in eastern Tallahassee, and took up residence in the Northwest Addition known as Frenchtown with other Black residents. Built in 1894 by Lewis and Lucretia Taylor, the Taylor House Museum of Historic Frenchtown has become a nationally recognized repository for African-American History and culture. Lewis was an educator and community leader, while Lucretia, a former slave had been a cook and seamstress. A granddaughter, Aquilina Howell, became a champion for the desegregation of Leon County Schools, becoming the district’s first female Assistant School Superintendent.

 

For more information, contact Curtis Taylor at (850) 251-3025, or (850) 222-6111.